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Hyperactive child : Always running around, doesn’t sit in one place

Hyperactive children who always run around, and have difficulty sitting still face challenges during activities that require focus for prolonged periods like school or meal times.

Children who are hyperactive, always running around, and have difficulty sitting still may face challenges in participating in activities that require focus for prolonged periods like school or meal times. If you are a parent who is concerned about your child's hyperactivity, read on to learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatment options.


What is Hyperactivity?


Hyperactivity refers to a child's constant movement and difficulty in staying still for long periods of time. This can make it challenging for them to participate in activities that require focus or concentration.


Signs and Symptoms of Hyperactivity


Here are some common signs and symptoms of hyperactivity that parents may observe in their child:

  • Constant movement and fidgeting

  • Difficulty staying seated during meals or activities

  • Interrupting others during conversation or activities

  • Easily distracted by toys or objects in the environment

  • Trouble following instructions or waiting their turn to play with a toy


Example Scenarios


Here are some example scenarios of how hyperactivity in children may manifest based on their age:

  • A 2-year-old child who runs around the house or yard, climbs on furniture, and doesn't stay in one place for more than a few seconds. They may have trouble following instructions or waiting their turn to play with a toy.

  • A 3-year-old child who has difficulty staying seated during a 10-minute meal or activity. They may fidget, squirm, or get up and down from their chair frequently.

  • A 4-year-old child who has trouble sitting through a 15-minute storytime or circle time activity. They may interrupt the teacher or caregiver, get up and walk around the room, or become easily distracted by toys or objects in their environment.

  • A 5-year-old child who runs around the playground, climbs on equipment, and doesn't stay in one place for more than a few seconds. They may have trouble following instructions or waiting their turn to play with a toy.

  • A 7-year-old child who can't sit still during a 20-minute class lesson. They may fidget, tap their feet, or talk out of turn, and they may have trouble paying attention or retaining information.

  • A 9-year-old child who has trouble sitting through a 30-minute meal at the dinner table. They may get up and down from their chair, leave the table to play with toys, or interrupt other family members during conversation.

  • An 11-year-old child who constantly moves and fidgets during a 45-minute movie or TV show. They may get up and pace, leave the room frequently, or switch between activities like drawing or playing with toys.


Causes of Hyperactivity


Hyperactivity can be caused by various factors such as:

  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

  • Anxiety or stress

  • Lack of sleep

  • Environmental factors such as neglect or lack of stimulation


Treatment for Hyperactivity


If you suspect that your child has hyperactivity issues, it is recommended that you speak with a mental health professional who can help assess their symptoms and provide support or interventions accordingly. Here are some behavior modification strategies that may be helpful for addressing hyperactivity:

  • Use Positive Reinforcement: Praise and reward the child for demonstrating good behavior, such as sitting still or following instructions.

  • Create a Structured and Predictable Environment: Create a routine and stick to it as much as possible. Use visual schedules and timers to help the child understand what is happening next.

  • Provide Physical Outlets: Provide opportunities for physical activity, such as outdoor play or sports, to help the child burn off excess energy and improve focus.

  • Use Fidget Toys:Fidget toys, such as stress balls or squeeze toys can provide a physical outlet for the child's energy and help them stay focused.

  • Provide Clear Instructions: Provide clear and concise instructions for the child, and use visual aids, such as pictures or diagrams to help them understand.

  • Minimize Distractions: Minimize distractions in the environment, such as noise or visual clutter. Provide a quiet and calm space for the child to work or play.

  • Teach Self-Regulation Skills: Teach the child self-regulation skills, such as deep breathing or counting to ten, to help them manage their emotions and impulses. Practicing these skills regularly can help them become more effective at self-regulation which can address hyperactivity issues.

Conclusion


Hyperactivity in children can be challenging for parents; however, with early intervention and treatment strategies like those listed above, most children can overcome hyperactivity issues. If you suspect your child has hyperactivity concerns that are affecting their daily life activities like schoolwork or meal times seek professional support from mental health providers who can help provide guidance and solutions to support your child's better health.

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