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Restlessness and Excessive Talkativeness in Children

Restlessness, excessive talkativeness, and fidgeting are common behaviors exhibited by many children. They may be symptoms of a variety of conditions, including ADHD and anxiety.

Restlessness, excessive talkativeness, and fidgeting are common behaviors exhibited by many children. However, if you are a parent who is concerned about your child's behavior, it may be helpful to learn more about the signs and symptoms of restlessness and excessive talkativeness in children, as well as some general recommendations for reducing these behaviors.


Symptoms of Restlessness and Excessive Talkativeness in Children


Here are some common symptoms that parents may observe in a child who is restless or excessively talkative:

  • Difficulty sitting still during quiet activities or conversations

  • Talking excessively or interrupting frequently during conversations with adults or peers

  • Trouble waiting their turn during games or activities with friends

  • Difficulty staying focused during playtime or classroom activities

  • Fidgeting, tapping feet or hands, or playing with objects around them


Causes of Restlessness and Excessive Talkativeness in Children


Restlessness and excessive talkativeness can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

  • Anxiety

  • Sensory processing issues

  • Developmental or learning disabilities


General Recommendations for Parents to Reduce Restless Behaviors in Children


Here are some general recommendations for parents to reduce restless behaviors in their children:

  • Seek professional help: If you have concerns about your child's behavior, it may be helpful to speak with their mental health professional who can provide guidance and support.

  • Provide sensory input: Provide the child with sensory input to help them regulate their body and calm down. This may include activities like playing with a fidget toy, bouncing on a therapy ball, or using a weighted blanket.

  • Break tasks into smaller chunks: Break tasks into smaller chunks to make them more manageable for the child. This can help reduce feelings of overwhelm and frustration.

  • Set clear expectations: Set clear expectations for behavior and provide positive reinforcement when the child meets those expectations. This can help the child learn appropriate behavior and reinforce positive behavior.

  • Encourage exercise: Encourage the child to engage in physical activity to help release excess energy and regulate their body. This may include activities like running, jumping, or playing outside.

  • Use visual supports: Use visual supports, such as schedules or checklists, to help the child understand what is expected of them and to help them stay organized and focused.

  • Seek professional help: Consider seeking help from a mental health professional or behavior therapist who can provide additional support and guidance for the child and their family.


It's important to note that restlessness, excessive talkativeness, and fidgeting can be symptoms of a variety of conditions, including ADHD and anxiety. If you are concerned about your child's behavior, speak with their healthcare provider or another qualified mental health professional for guidance and support.

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