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Child receiving speech and language therapy in Hyderabad
Speech and language therapy

You'll find overview of speech and language developmental issues in children, the workings of speech therapy and kinds of speech therapy in the following sections

By Daffodils CDC

  • Articulation Disorders: These are issues related to the production of speech sounds, which can make it difficult for children to be understood by others. For example, a child may substitute one sound for another, such as saying "wabbit" instead of "rabbit."
     

    Fluency Disorders: These disorders affect the rhythm and flow of speech, making it difficult for children to speak smoothly. Stuttering is an example of a fluency disorder.
     

    Voice Disorders: These disorders affect the quality and pitch of a child's voice, making it difficult for them to be understood by others. For example, a child with a hoarse voice or a voice that is too quiet may have a voice disorder.

  • Receptive Language Disorders: These disorders affect a child's ability to understand language. For example, a child may have difficulty following directions or answering questions.
     

    Expressive Language Disorders: These disorders affect a child's ability to use language to communicate with others. For example, a child may have difficulty putting words together to form sentences or may use incorrect grammar.
     

    Pragmatic Language Disorders: These disorders affect a child's ability to use language appropriately in social situations. For example, a child may have difficulty taking turns in a conversation or understanding nonverbal cues such as facial expressions.

  • A child with an articulation disorder may have difficulty saying the sounds "s" or "th" correctly, resulting in words such as "snake" being pronounced as "nake" or "three" being pronounced as "free."
     

    A child with a fluency disorder may repeat sounds or words, prolong sounds, or struggle to start a sentence, making it difficult to communicate effectively with others.
     

    A child with a receptive language disorder may have difficulty following directions, understanding complex sentences, or comprehending new vocabulary.
     

    A child with an expressive language disorder may struggle to put words together to form sentences or use incorrect grammar, making it difficult for others to understand them.
     

    A child with a pragmatic language disorder may struggle with turn-taking in a conversation, understanding sarcasm or humor, or using appropriate language in different social situations.

In conclusion, speech and language developmental issues can have a significant impact on a child's ability to communicate effectively with others. Early identification and intervention can help address these issues and improve a child's overall communication skills. Parents and caregivers should seek professional evaluation if they suspect their child has a speech or language developmental issue.

Speech and language developmental issues

Speech and language developmental issues are a common concern among parents and caregivers of young children. These issues can range from minor delays to more significant disabilities that require intervention and therapy.

  • The first step in speech therapy is an evaluation or assessment. A licensed speech-language pathologist (SLP) will assess the individual's speech, language, and communication skills to determine their strengths and areas that need improvement. They will also evaluate any underlying conditions or factors that may be contributing to the individual's communication difficulties.

  • Based on the assessment, the SLP will set specific goals for the individual to work on during therapy sessions. These goals will be tailored to the individual's unique needs and may include improving speech clarity, increasing vocabulary, or developing social communication skills.

  • Speech therapy sessions may be conducted one-on-one with the SLP or in a group setting, depending on the individual's needs. During therapy sessions, the SLP will work with the individual to practice specific communication skills and techniques. They may use a variety of techniques such as visual aids, games, and role-playing to make therapy engaging and fun.

  • In between therapy sessions, the individual may be given homework assignments to practice specific communication skills. Practicing outside of therapy is an essential part of improving communication skills and making progress towards the set goals.

  • Throughout the therapy process, the SLP will monitor the individual's progress and adjust therapy goals and techniques as needed. They will also provide feedback to the individual and their caregivers on progress towards goals and areas that still need work.

Overall, speech therapy is a collaborative process that involves the individual, their caregivers, and the SLP working together to improve communication skills. With consistent practice and support, individuals can make significant progress and achieve their communication goals.

How does speech and language therapy work?

Speech therapy is a type of intervention that helps individuals improve their ability to communicate effectively. It can be beneficial for individuals of all ages who are experiencing difficulties with speech, language, or communication. Here are the general steps that speech therapy typically involves

  • This type of therapy is used to help individuals who have difficulty producing certain speech sounds. The therapy involves practicing the correct production of specific sounds and using techniques to help the individual improve their speech clarity.

  • This type of therapy is used to help individuals who have difficulty with understanding or using language. It can involve activities to improve vocabulary, grammar, sentence structure, and comprehension.

  • This type of therapy is used to help individuals who stutter or have other fluency disorders. The therapy may involve techniques such as breathing exercises, speech rate control, and desensitization to reduce anxiety.

  • This type of therapy is used to help individuals who have voice disorders, such as vocal nodules, hoarseness, or pitch problems. The therapy may involve exercises to improve vocal quality, breath support, and resonance.

  • This type of therapy is used to help individuals who have severe communication difficulties and may not be able to communicate verbally. AAC therapy involves teaching the individual to use devices, such as communication boards or speech-generating devices, to express themselves.

  • This type of therapy is used to help individuals who have difficulty with social communication, such as understanding social cues, taking turns in conversation, and making eye contact. The therapy may involve role-playing, video modeling, and social stories.

Overall, speech and language therapy can be highly individualized and tailored to the specific needs of each individual.

Different kinds of speech and language therapy

There are several different types of speech and language therapy that can be used to treat communication disorders. The type of therapy that is used will depend on the Child’s specific needs and the nature of their communication disorder. Here are some of the most common types of speech and language therapy

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